Battersea Powerstation, Clapham Deep Shelter, Part One


The trip turned out to be crazy, we didn’t think we would get away on more than one occasion.
 
It started with Nick & Millhouse picking me up from my gaff and then heading over to Sho’s, after a fill up of fuel and fizzy drinks we floated down the M1. The journey took a few hours – stories were told, the rain continued to pour, previous Police encounters in the capital were explained and the few ideas that we had were plotted and pushed.
 
 We met with the London duo Andrew & Dicky. These guys were to show us the ropes of London that night, I have a massive respect for you guys.
We headed for the white four stack that sits in the south of the city, made famous from the cover of ‘animals’. With the route planned out it was the giant of Battersea power station that loomed ahead, I’d wanted photographs from here for a fair few years.
 
Those who have visited the site will know the intensity of the lighting and cameras –  with a quick pace we dodged concrete, climbed fences and clambered through the dirt. Myself, Sho, Millhouse & Nick headed for the roof while the London guys held the fort below us. A couple of shots later and we came down to the ground.
 
The powerstation was formed in two sections with A side in the 1930’s and B side in the 1950’s, she ceased to operate in 1983.
 

The escape was made and it was off with our sleeping bags over to the Gillette Factory.

Originally the dusty factory floor was the plan but we later learned of a hotel mock up situated inside the building. After a few laughs getting into the place we sorted the gear for the next day, talked the previous night through and the plans for the next day. By this time it was well into the morning, the sun was cutting through the curtains.
 
 

After a poor effort at a good night sleep we woke to this awesome clock tower, oh and some rich boy left his Maserati inside too.



Off for a wash at Tesco, then onwards.


This as you may or may not know is Clapham north deep level shelter. After taking the spiral staircase we wandered through the countless cheese grate that forms the roof – similar to the stuff in drains. The tunnels are quite photogenic, but scran was calling so we upped and left.

I’ll update the next post in a couple of days, all I can say now is that after feeding the masses the giant in the sky faced us.

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